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With so many snakes in collection there's allways something happening.... 
Check what happened over the years in this logbook...

Logbook 2005:

2005:
2006:
2007:
2008:
2009:
2010:
2011:
2012:
2013-2015:
December 25
75% of the Corallus h.h. offspring 2005 is eating spontaneously. The others did not eat at all but are still looking good. No reason to worry.  It was a small litter with large youngsters. These snakes are colouring up nicely. Compare: above offspring 2005, right offspring 2003 from the same mother.
December 12 Our offspring 2004 corallus h.h. did eat on the 10th. One of the youngsters was found lying on his back under the hot spot this morning. We only saw this behaviour before on pregnant females.
October 02 Both Morelia viridis we found in spasm in August died. They were reasonable eaters. We don't know the cause of their spasm.
September 1 Several youngsters of the Morelia viridis 2005 litter are doing extremely well. They accept dead and alive prey from the forceps, they grow well and did shed several times. It's time to say goodbye. 
See the on-sale page
 
August
29
Both females did accept a subadult rat after their delivery.

On the photo you can see the typical balling -posture (better known from Python regius). It is our experience that you only see this behaviour in Corallus h. hortulanus only in the first weeks after birth.

August
28
Party time again this morning... Female number 3 produced a litter of 7 last night. Again no dead youngsters of unfurtile eggs found. Her pregnancy did last for 231 days (if the first mating on Januari 9 was succesfull)

The size of both litters surprised us...We did expect larger litters because  both females are young (5 years), healthy and we did not use them in our 2004 breeding program.

August
27
Female number 2 gave birth last night. She had an offspring of 9, all alive and kickin'. No unfurtile eggs found. Her pregnancy did last for 230 days (if the first mating on January 9 was succesfull). What a beautiful colours even before the first shedding !! 
August 
03
We found one of the 2005 offspringMorelia virirdis on the bottom of her terrarium coilled up in this strange way. One of the others had the same behaviour a few days ago. It stopped spontaneously and that animal started eating one day later.

If anybody has a suggestion what the reason for this behaviour might be please contact us.

July 
30
Two pictures of female number 2. Left you see her before pregnancy, the right one was made this week. It clearly shows the changing of colours during pregnancy.
Mating was in January, we expect offspring in September.
July 
20
 
 

 

One of our 2003 offspring Corallus h.. hortulanus died.
We fed the snake last night. She never had an adult mouse before but did not hesitate to accept him. This morning we found her dead with the stomach twice the size of the mouse. She probably died of an perforation ...
June
10
The final score:
Morelia viridis produced 23 eggs (not 21 as we first thought). All eggs were furtile. After 55-56 days in the incubator 19 snakes were born . 
18 spontaneous and 1 after opening the egg manually. One of the spontaneous born died within an hour. The others are doing well.
After opening the last four eggs we found 4 dead but fullgrown snakes. One had an abnormality on his back, the others appeared to be normal.
June 
08
What a site to see!!
The counter is on sixteen, including one dead (in the right upper corner). Even the collapsed eggs on top did hatch. 

If the last five eggs do not hatch within twelve hours we'll open them manually
 
 
 
 

 

June 
06
Over the last few days the eggs on top collapsed even more. Although the eggs are due, dehydration can be the reason too. We did not dare to encrease the humidity because of the good condition of the other eggs. We started worrying but this evening, after 55 days, the first one showed his beautiful face to the world. 

All eggs do look furtile, but some of the top ones are collapsed a lot...

June 
03
The morelia eggs are in the incubator now for 52 days. According to the books the incubation periode is between 50 and 67 days: 
(Trutnau 50-55 days, Weier 48 -67 days, Ross 45/50 - 60/65). 
They should hatch between june 2 and june 18. 
 
May 
25
The morelia eggs are in the incubator for 43 days today. The photo (made this morning) shows that the ones on top start to collapes a bit. Maybe they receive a bit less moist than the ones on the tissues.

The pregnancy of both female Corallus hortulanus is going wel. Their colour becomes darker by the week (a sign of pregnancy) and they grow well.

May 
24
The female Anteresia childreni appeared not to be pragnant afterall. We did see matings and she stopped eating.... If we keep this group we will let the other male mate with her next year.

Two of our 2004 offspring Morelia virirdis start changing colour. We noticed a bit of a greenish colour on their head. We are curious how long the change of colour will take; We had animals that changed within the month while others took over half a year to become completely green.

May 
05
Anteresia childreni is due to lay eggs, but she started eating again. That's not a good sign, ... maybe she's not pregnant afterall?  
April 
29
The morelia eggs in the incubator are doing nicely. 
The complete clutch of 21 eggs grew over the last two weeks.
One egg has some mould on it. Not really something that worries me.

One day after the removal of the eggs the female accepted a rat. She had 3 feedings over the last two weeks and is doing well.

 

April
12
Morelia virirdis showes brooding behaviour since yesterday morning. Several years ago we lost a female during the brooding periode so we decided to brood the eggs artificially in a incubator on 29,7 degrees Celsius and a humidity of 95%. 

We removed the female from 21 eggs. They all look fertile. 
Her gestation period was 89 days (if the first mating on januari 12 was succesfull)

April 
10
Morelia viridis was in and out of the laying site for the last several days. Since yesterday evening she stays inside. No brooding behaniour seen
March 
27
The female Anteresia childrenistopped eating en grows nicely. 
Eggs are expected at the end of april.
 
March 
20
Morelia viridis is certainly pregnant. She stopped eating, is growing en her basic colour is changing to a lighter shade of green. She is offered the same laying site as last year: a terra-cotta flowerpot in a washing-up bowl filled with moist vermicullite. Temperature on this spot is 28 degrees Celsius (constantly)  
February 21 Corallus male 05 and female 21 seperated. 
No sexual behaviour seen since introduction on januari 10.
Maybe he's to young??
 
February 06 Morelia viridis couple seperated. Several matings seen over the last few weeks. Expecting eggs in april  
January 
12
Morelia viridis couple put together with matings on the same evening.
January 
10
Corallus male 05 introduced to female 21. 
Both animals are not interested in each other.
Anteresia childreni (two males, one female) put together. One male removed within the hour because of fightings. The other male mated with her the same evening.
 
January 
09
Corallus male 15 introduced to female 02. Mating within the hour.
Male 20 follows the good example and is mating with female 03 (see picture).
January 
08
Corallus male 20 introduced to female 03. Interested in each other but no matings seen  
January 
01
The decision on making a homepage on our corallus group was made. Also we decided which animals would be in the 2005 breeding program
2005:
2006:
2007:
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2009:
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